Archery on Horseback Becomes Popular Again-As a Sport

It’s not just a method of hunting or a strategy for battle anymore, and the athletes’ training regimen is intense. By Heather Brady PUBLISHED May 22, 2018 An ancient sport is making a comeback among younger generations. Mounted archery, a tradition with roots in empires like the Ottomans and the Mongols, has become popular again in Indonesia. While ancient warriors used the practice of shooting arrows from horseback for hunting and combat, its resurgence has become friendlier: Archers from different countries go through an intense training regimen to compete locally and internationally. The sport involves shooting arrows at a target while riding a horse. Successfully hitting a target with arrows is tricky when an athlete is standing or sitting on stable ground; when an archer is riding a horse, it requires even more balance, a high level of coordination, and a connection between the horse and archer. Mounted archery was used by many ancient cultures around the world, including Native Americans, European nomads, and Asian empires. It appears across cultural images and texts for several millennia and continued to be used until gunpowder and firearms were developed. As guns became popular, using a bow and arrow became less advantageous, and mounted archery was largely abandoned as a battlefield strategy. As communities in countries like Mongolia began honoring their predecessors and history by exploring ancient traditions, and after the sport appeared in mainstream pop culture through franchises like the Hunger Games, […]

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Monster-sized goldfish are taking over an Alberta city that now has to cull them by the thousands

Leah Kongsrude, St. Albert’s environment director, says she’s seen captured goldfish up to 30 centimetres in length, compared to ones sold by pet stores that measure only about two centimetres Thousands of gold fish have been removed from a pond in Cobourg, Ont. on Friday November 14, 2014. Postmedia ST. ALBERT, Alta. — Workers have dipped nets and a naturally […]

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Ancient ‘Monster’ Elephant Was 50 Percent Bigger Than Modern Cousins

By Laura Geggel, Senior Writer | August 30, 2017   A tusk belonging to the 500,000-year-old elephant that researchers discovered in Saudi Arabia’s Nafud Desert. Credit: Saudi Geological Survey CALGARY, Alberta — Half a million years ago, the Arabian Peninsula wasn’t a sandy desert but rather a lush, wet landscape. There, a gigantic elephant — 50 percent larger than today’s […]

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66 Million Years Ago, Bird-Like Dinosaurs Laid Blue-Green Eggs

By Mindy Weisberger, Senior Writer | August 31, 2017  Fossilized eggs belonging to the Cretaceous dinosaur Heyuannia huangi hold traces of pigment hinting that they were a blue-green color. To the naked eye, they appear blackish-brown. A type of bird-like dinosaur that lived in what is now China during the Cretaceous period — about 145.5 million to 65.5 million years […]

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This sea snake looks like a banana and hunts like a Slinky

SEEING YELLOW  A newly discovered sea snake subspecies (top) is shorter — and a lot brighter — than its yellow-bellied brethren (bottom). BESSESEN With its bright hue, this snake was bound to stand out sooner or later. A newly discovered subspecies of sea snake, Hydrophis platurus xanthos, has a narrow geographic range and an unusual hunting trick. The canary-yellow reptile […]

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